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“WHY AM I SHOUTING AT MY CHILDREN?!”

It was early in the morning. I hadn’t been up for more than ten minutes but I had already shouted at my boys three times.  Having been a teacher, I’m usually pretty good at what I call “professional calm” – the ability to avoid getting wound up in the emotions of the moment and respond calmly to a situation.  Normally, I’m a minimal shouter but there was no sign of that woman on this particular morning.  “Why am I shouting at my children?” I wondered.

When I find myself shouting, it is a signal to go inwards, not to blame my children – even when they’ve trailed mud over the newly-cleaned floor.  My shouting is a prompt to ask myself what’s going on with me that I can’t muster up my professional calm in this moment?  Often just knowing why I’m really shouting, seeing that it’s not really about my boys at all, helps me to regain perspective and stop taking whatever it is out on them.

 

REASONS WE MIGHT SHOUT AT OUR CHILDREN

Here are some of the main reasons I shout.  What makes you shouty?

  1. I’m tired. This is the main reason I shout. When I’m tired, I become hypersensitive and my tolerance level plummets.  Something that would’ve been irritating on a normal day, like Thomas pouring my drink into his cup ‘til overflowing while I’m not looking, becomes infuriating when I’m tired.
  2. I’m overwhelmed. When I’m overwhelmed by all I need to do, any added demand, such as being asked for another snack, feels like harassment.
  3. I’m triggered. Sometimes, my boys hit a sensitive spot and my ego comes out roaring. Eg.“How dare he disrespect me!” Being disrespected hits a tender place for me.  I question my worth and I spiral downwards within – and loudly without.   (See my post How Our Children Raise Us for more on being triggered by our children.)
  4. My children are doing just the thing that winds me up. Thomas has a squeal perfectly-pitched to grate on my nerves. My reaction is almost a biological response rather than a mental/emotional one.  He usually squeals when being provoked by Jake.  Thomas’ squeal and Jake’s aggravation are a lethal combination that sends me bananas.
  5. I’m in a rush. You don’t need to be told that children have a completely different sense of timing to adults. (The joys of not being able to read a clock.)  I hate being late and lose patience when my boys are slowing us down.
  6. I’m preoccupied. Sometimes, there’s an issue with my boys that I haven’t taken the time to get to the bottom of because I’m in the middle of something. Perhaps I’ve called out to them to stop arguing over a toy but they actually need some help to come up with a fair way to share it.  Without my guidance, the arguing gets louder and more aggressive…and so do I.  Sometimes, I’ve just got to put my plans on pause, get present, and deal with the issue properly.

 

HIT THE RESET BUTTON

The magic is that, in any situation, we can choose again. We can hit the reset button and respond differently, without shouting.  When time is short, I simply take a breath.  With that breath, I imagine shedding my upset self  like a snake sheds its skin, leaving only the Loving part of myself remaining.  I return to the situation with her instead.  Just the intention to approach the situation with Love makes a difference. (We can teach our children to do this too.)  When I need more than a moment to make the switch to Love, I turn on the kettle and the tv, giving us all a 10-minute break to diffuse the situation.  My professional calm returns and I continue – without shouting.

Yesterday, the boys and I were in the car and it was a case #1 and of #4 in combination.  Having been working on this post, I was determined not to shout.  Being in the car, there was no kettle or tv in sight.  So, I stopped the car, told my boys I would drive again when Thomas had stopped squealing & Jake had stopped bothering him and got out.  I stood quietly on the pavement until I felt calmer and was sure the kafuffle between my boys was over.  It was a quiet drive home.

 

RECOVERING FROM OUR SHOUTING EPISODES

When I have shouted at my boys, I always apologise.  When they shout, I tell them that they can express whatever they have to say but must do so respectfully.  Same goes for me.  Whatever the reason I’m shouting, my spiritual beliefs insist that I always treat others with love, knowing everyone is worthy of kindness and respect at all times.  I only apologise when I’m ready, though, able to be sincere.  (See my post Should I Make My Children Apologise?)

It doesn’t feel good to have been the shouting mum, it’s not how I want to be.  So I also have to forgive myself. I don’t want to carry my guilt around with me, it will only sour the next moment.  Having a shouty moment – or a shouty day, even – doesn’t mean we’re bad people or bad parents.  It just means there’s something going on for us.  It shows us that we need a little TLC of some sort – we all do sometimes.

 

Much love to you and your little souls,

 

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My Best Discipline Technique

At the end of my last post, Discipline 101, I promised I’d share my best discipline technique with you so I’ll jump right in.

Here it is –

Presence.

Maybe you were hoping for something a bit more “practical”- 3 steps to take when your child’s behaviour goes askew, perhaps.  We all want a magical, quick-fix strategy to manage our children’s difficult behaviour and the discomfort it can cause.  But, when they require guidance, it’s our presence, not strategies that is needed.

By “presence” I mean having our attention focussed fully on our child and the moment we are experiencing with them (not on the phone call we just finished or where we have to be in ten minutes’ time).  Our total presence with our children enables us to tune into them and to see what is really going on.  Without presence, our ego gets loud – “he’s blatantly disrespecting me!” it shouts in our heads.  “He’s not getting away with it!”  With presence, our Love asks, “what is he needing from me right now?”

Two very different responses will come from these different kinds of thoughts.  The ego will likely make a declaration of our authority and perhaps an arbitrary removal of a ‘privilege’.   Love might acknowledge how our child is feeling, offer a comforting cuddle and, when they’re ready, an appropriate follow-up.  (See my post, No Such Thing as a Naughty Child)

I’m not a fan of using strategies thoughtlessly, but some good ones have come to me in moments of presence that I’ve been able to reuse selectively in the future.  One such technique is my “try that again” strategy for when my boys speak disrespectfully to myself or someone else.  Jake went through a phase of putting up big resistance when it came time to set the table for dinner.  I started feeling a sense of dread when I needed to ask him to do it because of the roaring, stomping and whining that would ensue.  One evening, my simple request for Jake to set the table had evoked a shout of “No!” and an exaggerated stamp of the foot.   He had struck me in a moment of presence and I realised it was upto me how things would go – whether I escalated the situation by arguing with him both about the way he had addressed me and the setting of the table or whether he accepted his job and did it, albeit grudgingly.  I recognised that all he was needing was a bit of understanding that he didn’t want to set the table – he knew the expectation wouldn’t change.  So I said to him, “try that again”.  He looked at me, puzzled. “Tell me what you have to say respectfully”, I said.  He hesitated for a moment then mumbled, “I don’t want to set the table”.  “I know it can be annoying to be interrupted from your play to set the table”, I commiserated then continued, “ it still needs to be done so we can eat our dinner”.  He went ahead and set the table.  Through presence, I had reminded him to speak respectfully to others, given him a chance to say what he had to say and got him to set the table.  Now, I just say, “try that again” when he speaks disrespectfully and usually the situation is diffused because he’s being polite and I’m listening to how he’s feeling.  So simple, yet I don’t think I would’ve thought of it had I been trying to “figure out” what I should do when he refused to set the table.

I regard presence as an essential personal and parenting skill (see my post Just Be: Presence and Stillness).  It helps us to discipline effectively and with Love.  In any moment, disciplinary or otherwise, it allows us to really see our children and recognise what is required of us.

Much love to you and your little souls,

 

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Discipline 101: Love-Based Principles

With Christmas around the corner, perhaps you are bracing yourself for your children’s “holiday behaviour”.  We know they will be excited and more tired than usual.  They’ll likely test the boundaries to see if there’s any “holiday flex” in them too.  Or it may be that, heading into the new year, you’re wanting to change the dynamic between yourself and your child so that it is more respectful and peaceful.  This time of year can be particularly joyful and particularly testing for parents so it seems a good time to offer a few thoughts on discipline from a spiritual point-of-view.  I try to appeal to the love in my children to encourage the best from them first but, there are times when discipline is needed.

 

DISCIPLINE: LOVE & FEAR

From teachers of A Course in Miracles, I have learned that, in life, we are constantly choosing between Love and fear.  In a spiritually-led life, we aim to choose Love every time, though, of course, we don’t always manage to do so.  We can bring our intention to Love to those moments when we need to discipline our children.  To highlight the features of a love-based approach, let’s compare the two –

Fear-based Discipline:  With a fear-based approach, we use discipline to control our children so that they behave in a way that we judge as acceptable.  We don’t see our child in this approach, blinded by our own egoic fear – fear of being judged for our children’s behaviour, fear of losing control of our children, fear that our children won’t respect us…  We go on to create fear in our children in an attempt to avoid the things we’re fearful of,making threats and dishing out punishments of various kinds.  The punishments may be practical, such as removing screen time, or they may be emotional, such as humiliating our child or expressing our disapproval of them.  Ultimately, we undermine their self worth when we discipline from fear.  Sometimes their behaviour improves quickly, it may appear to “work”, but at the cost of our child’s belief in their own inherent value.  We set our children up for a long-term struggle with fear and unworthiness.

Love-based Discipline: With a love-based approach, we use discipline is to teach our children.  And what we are teaching them is to stay aligned with their own true nature.  When disciplining from Love, we remember that our children are our spiritual equals, each a representation of God, just as we are.  We know that they are essentially “good” and it is only their behaviour that needs correcting, not themselves.  When disciplining them, we have unconditional Love for them in the form of non-judgement and respect, even when we feel differently about their behaviour.  The discipline techniques we use when we are coming from Love can sometimes be slower to see effect but leave our child’s self-worth intact and empower them to be the marvellous person that they are.

 

PRINCIPLES OF LOVE-BASED PARENTING

S0, here are a few ideas to guide us in disciplining our children with Love.

  1. Be Respectful We need to be asking ourselves when disciplining whether we are being respectful of our child or not. We can measure how respectful we are towards our children by the respect they have for us (this can be sobering at times).  Our respect for our child can be shown in many different ways when disciplining them.  For example, when possible, we should give our child a (one) reminder of the expectation and the consequences if they continue their inappropriate behaviour before we follow through.  Suddenly springing a “punishment” on them when they’ve gotten carried away and forgotten to manage themselves is disrespectful and doesn’t give them the opportunity to self-correct (which is preferable for everyone).  Another way that we unwittingly disrespect our children is to send them to their bedrooms as a punishment.  I think we need to respect their bedrooms as their sanctuaries (see my post Home Sweet Home – A Place for Our Souls), a place they can retreat to when needed.  Let’s not make it their jail.
  2. Be Consistent By managing behaviour using a familiar set of expectations & consequences and applying them consistently, our children know exactly where the boundaries are and what will happen if they don’t stay within them. They can then deliberately choose for themselves how to behave (and sometimes they may decide the consequences for stepping outside of the boundaries are worth the excursion!).  Consistency allows us to carry out any necessary consequences in an objective way – we can calmly follow our family’s process and detach our emotions from the situation to an extent.
  3. Always Make Emotional Support Available To Love our children unconditionally is to do so regardless of their behaviour. When they are struggling with the emotions of a situation, we cannot withdraw our support without giving them the message that they are unworthy of our love in that moment. Sometimes, I offer a cuddle in the middle of a disciplining situation because I can see my son needs reassurance and help to manage his big emotions.  A child’s emotions need to be allowed to settle before they are in a position to learn anything from the situation (see my post Helping Children to Manage Difficult Emotions).
  4. Allow Life to be the Teacher Many situations are “self-disciplining”. By this, I mean that the natural consequences of a child’s actions are enough to teach them what they have to learn.  In these situations, we need to step back a little and give our child the space to experience life’s lessons.  I’ll explain this further in the section below.

 

SELF-DISCIPLING SITUATIONS

I can think of three types of self-disciplining situation where the lesson naturally unfolds and we just need to allow it to.

  1. A natural emotional response There have been times when Jake has done something he shouldn’t have and I have immediately seen the regret on his face. The point doesn’t need driving home any further. He has learned.
  2. A natural consequence A simple example of this is when our child treats a playmate unkindly and the other child refuses to play with them anymore.  Fair enough!
  3. A natural opportunity to put things right For example, Thomas, like many two-year-olds, sometimes spits his food out if he doesn’t like it. I don’t mind (too much) if he spits in back onto his plate but sometimes he spits it on the floor. When he does, I simply get him to pick up the food and put it on his plate and remind him briefly of our rule.  No fuss needed.

In any of these types of situation, there is no need to use an arbitrary punishment to make our point. ( What does his television-watching have to do with spitting food, for example?)  There’s also no need to add heat to these situations with a telling-off or lecture.  If we do need to explain things a little further to help our children grasp their lesson, we can do so in a calm, informative way.  Fear-based parenting can see our egos wanting to have a bit of an authoritative rant at this stage, but it’s unnecessary and only serves to undermine our child and, in turn, our relationship with them.

 

IN SUMMARY: MANAGING OURSELVES

When disciplining our children, we are really managing ourselves!  We are putting aside our fear and allowing Love to be the teacher.  This can be hard to do when our buttons have been pushed and we are feeling tired & frazzled.  If you see yourself in my description of fear-based discipline, as I do regularly, please forgive yourself.  So much of our fear is unconscious and most of us are doing the very best that we can.

What we are wanting is for our children to come through the disciplinary experience a little wiser and with their self-worth intact.  I’m sure I will come back to the topic of discipline many times, it’s complex and often highly emotional.  I hope I’ve provided a good starting point today.  Look out for my first post of 2017, “My Best Discipline Technique”.

 

Much love to you and your little souls,

 

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