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Discipline 101: Love-Based Principles

With Christmas around the corner, perhaps you are bracing yourself for your children’s “holiday behaviour”.  We know they will be excited and more tired than usual.  They’ll likely test the boundaries to see if there’s any “holiday flex” in them too.  Or it may be that, heading into the new year, you’re wanting to change the dynamic between yourself and your child so that it is more respectful and peaceful.  This time of year can be particularly joyful and particularly testing for parents so it seems a good time to offer a few thoughts on discipline from a spiritual point-of-view.  I try to appeal to the love in my children to encourage the best from them first but, there are times when discipline is needed.

 

DISCIPLINE: LOVE & FEAR

From teachers of A Course in Miracles, I have learned that, in life, we are constantly choosing between Love and fear.  In a spiritually-led life, we aim to choose Love every time, though, of course, we don’t always manage to do so.  We can bring our intention to Love to those moments when we need to discipline our children.  To highlight the features of a love-based approach, let’s compare the two –

Fear-based Discipline:  With a fear-based approach, we use discipline to control our children so that they behave in a way that we judge as acceptable.  We don’t see our child in this approach, blinded by our own egoic fear – fear of being judged for our children’s behaviour, fear of losing control of our children, fear that our children won’t respect us…  We go on to create fear in our children in an attempt to avoid the things we’re fearful of,making threats and dishing out punishments of various kinds.  The punishments may be practical, such as removing screen time, or they may be emotional, such as humiliating our child or expressing our disapproval of them.  Ultimately, we undermine their self worth when we discipline from fear.  Sometimes their behaviour improves quickly, it may appear to “work”, but at the cost of our child’s belief in their own inherent value.  We set our children up for a long-term struggle with fear and unworthiness.

Love-based Discipline: With a love-based approach, we use discipline is to teach our children.  And what we are teaching them is to stay aligned with their own true nature.  When disciplining from Love, we remember that our children are our spiritual equals, each a representation of God, just as we are.  We know that they are essentially “good” and it is only their behaviour that needs correcting, not themselves.  When disciplining them, we have unconditional Love for them in the form of non-judgement and respect, even when we feel differently about their behaviour.  The discipline techniques we use when we are coming from Love can sometimes be slower to see effect but leave our child’s self-worth intact and empower them to be the marvellous person that they are.

 

PRINCIPLES OF LOVE-BASED PARENTING

S0, here are a few ideas to guide us in disciplining our children with Love.

  1. Be Respectful We need to be asking ourselves when disciplining whether we are being respectful of our child or not. We can measure how respectful we are towards our children by the respect they have for us (this can be sobering at times).  Our respect for our child can be shown in many different ways when disciplining them.  For example, when possible, we should give our child a (one) reminder of the expectation and the consequences if they continue their inappropriate behaviour before we follow through.  Suddenly springing a “punishment” on them when they’ve gotten carried away and forgotten to manage themselves is disrespectful and doesn’t give them the opportunity to self-correct (which is preferable for everyone).  Another way that we unwittingly disrespect our children is to send them to their bedrooms as a punishment.  I think we need to respect their bedrooms as their sanctuaries (see my post Home Sweet Home – A Place for Our Souls), a place they can retreat to when needed.  Let’s not make it their jail.
  2. Be Consistent By managing behaviour using a familiar set of expectations & consequences and applying them consistently, our children know exactly where the boundaries are and what will happen if they don’t stay within them. They can then deliberately choose for themselves how to behave (and sometimes they may decide the consequences for stepping outside of the boundaries are worth the excursion!).  Consistency allows us to carry out any necessary consequences in an objective way – we can calmly follow our family’s process and detach our emotions from the situation to an extent.
  3. Always Make Emotional Support Available To Love our children unconditionally is to do so regardless of their behaviour. When they are struggling with the emotions of a situation, we cannot withdraw our support without giving them the message that they are unworthy of our love in that moment. Sometimes, I offer a cuddle in the middle of a disciplining situation because I can see my son needs reassurance and help to manage his big emotions.  A child’s emotions need to be allowed to settle before they are in a position to learn anything from the situation (see my post Helping Children to Manage Difficult Emotions).
  4. Allow Life to be the Teacher Many situations are “self-disciplining”. By this, I mean that the natural consequences of a child’s actions are enough to teach them what they have to learn.  In these situations, we need to step back a little and give our child the space to experience life’s lessons.  I’ll explain this further in the section below.

 

SELF-DISCIPLING SITUATIONS

I can think of three types of self-disciplining situation where the lesson naturally unfolds and we just need to allow it to.

  1. A natural emotional response There have been times when Jake has done something he shouldn’t have and I have immediately seen the regret on his face. The point doesn’t need driving home any further. He has learned.
  2. A natural consequence A simple example of this is when our child treats a playmate unkindly and the other child refuses to play with them anymore.  Fair enough!
  3. A natural opportunity to put things right For example, Thomas, like many two-year-olds, sometimes spits his food out if he doesn’t like it. I don’t mind (too much) if he spits in back onto his plate but sometimes he spits it on the floor. When he does, I simply get him to pick up the food and put it on his plate and remind him briefly of our rule.  No fuss needed.

In any of these types of situation, there is no need to use an arbitrary punishment to make our point. ( What does his television-watching have to do with spitting food, for example?)  There’s also no need to add heat to these situations with a telling-off or lecture.  If we do need to explain things a little further to help our children grasp their lesson, we can do so in a calm, informative way.  Fear-based parenting can see our egos wanting to have a bit of an authoritative rant at this stage, but it’s unnecessary and only serves to undermine our child and, in turn, our relationship with them.

 

IN SUMMARY: MANAGING OURSELVES

When disciplining our children, we are really managing ourselves!  We are putting aside our fear and allowing Love to be the teacher.  This can be hard to do when our buttons have been pushed and we are feeling tired & frazzled.  If you see yourself in my description of fear-based discipline, as I do regularly, please forgive yourself.  So much of our fear is unconscious and most of us are doing the very best that we can.

What we are wanting is for our children to come through the disciplinary experience a little wiser and with their self-worth intact.  I’m sure I will come back to the topic of discipline many times, it’s complex and often highly emotional.  I hope I’ve provided a good starting point today.  Look out for my first post of 2017, “My Best Discipline Technique”.

 

Much love to you and your little souls,

 

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