My Best Discipline Technique

At the end of my last post, Discipline 101, I promised I’d share my best discipline technique with you so I’ll jump right in.

Here it is –

Presence.

Maybe you were hoping for something a bit more “practical”- 3 steps to take when your child’s behaviour goes askew, perhaps.  We all want a magical, quick-fix strategy to manage our children’s difficult behaviour and the discomfort it can cause.  But, when they require guidance, it’s our presence, not strategies that is needed.

By “presence” I mean having our attention focussed fully on our child and the moment we are experiencing with them (not on the phone call we just finished or where we have to be in ten minutes’ time).  Our total presence with our children enables us to tune into them and to see what is really going on.  Without presence, our ego gets loud – “he’s blatantly disrespecting me!” it shouts in our heads.  “He’s not getting away with it!”  With presence, our Love asks, “what is he needing from me right now?”

Two very different responses will come from these different kinds of thoughts.  The ego will likely make a declaration of our authority and perhaps an arbitrary removal of a ‘privilege’.   Love might acknowledge how our child is feeling, offer a comforting cuddle and, when they’re ready, an appropriate follow-up.  (See my post, No Such Thing as a Naughty Child)

I’m not a fan of using strategies thoughtlessly, but some good ones have come to me in moments of presence that I’ve been able to reuse selectively in the future.  One such technique is my “try that again” strategy for when my boys speak disrespectfully to myself or someone else.  Jake went through a phase of putting up big resistance when it came time to set the table for dinner.  I started feeling a sense of dread when I needed to ask him to do it because of the roaring, stomping and whining that would ensue.  One evening, my simple request for Jake to set the table had evoked a shout of “No!” and an exaggerated stamp of the foot.   He had struck me in a moment of presence and I realised it was upto me how things would go – whether I escalated the situation by arguing with him both about the way he had addressed me and the setting of the table or whether he accepted his job and did it, albeit grudgingly.  I recognised that all he was needing was a bit of understanding that he didn’t want to set the table – he knew the expectation wouldn’t change.  So I said to him, “try that again”.  He looked at me, puzzled. “Tell me what you have to say respectfully”, I said.  He hesitated for a moment then mumbled, “I don’t want to set the table”.  “I know it can be annoying to be interrupted from your play to set the table”, I commiserated then continued, “ it still needs to be done so we can eat our dinner”.  He went ahead and set the table.  Through presence, I had reminded him to speak respectfully to others, given him a chance to say what he had to say and got him to set the table.  Now, I just say, “try that again” when he speaks disrespectfully and usually the situation is diffused because he’s being polite and I’m listening to how he’s feeling.  So simple, yet I don’t think I would’ve thought of it had I been trying to “figure out” what I should do when he refused to set the table.

I regard presence as an essential personal and parenting skill (see my post Just Be: Presence and Stillness).  It helps us to discipline effectively and with Love.  In any moment, disciplinary or otherwise, it allows us to really see our children and recognise what is required of us.

Much love to you and your little souls,

 

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