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Teaching Children About Forgiveness

When Jake was a pre-schooler, I often noticed him hanging on to things after giving him a firm word or disciplining him in some way.  He seemed uncertain how to interact with me, unsure whether I was still upset with him or not.  So my husband and I started making a point of telling him that it was “finished” once any discipline had been dealt with.  We would then continue as normal, ensuring our manner with Jack was back to usual, not angry or upset in any way.  This was to show him that the incident was over and no hard feelings remained.  Looking back, I can see that this was a precursor to teaching him about forgiveness.

Last week, the long school holidays were getting the better of us both.  It felt to me that Jake wasn’t listening to much of what I said (unless the word “chocolate” featured) and I was tired of being patient & consistent.  I ended up shouting in exasperation.  Later, as we both sat at the table having morning tea, we exchanged apologies for our behaviour.  Jake kept repeating his apology despite my acceptance and I realised that I had never spoken explicitly about forgiveness with him.  So, I reminded him of how I used to say “finished” after a telling-off so that he knew it was over.  “When we forgive someone, we decide that it is finished, we decide not to keep feeling upset with the other person”, I told him.

That was enough for one morning but our chat made me realise that there is so much for a person to learn about forgiveness.  Many adults struggle with it.  And perhaps it’s because we don’t truly understand what forgiveness is – a gift to ourselves.

 

4 CHARACTERISTICS OF FORGIVENESS

Having given it some thought, I’ve come up with four characteristics of true forgiveness that we can aim to pass on to our children.  They may not grasp it all at first as forgiveness can look different on the outside than it is on the inside.  From the outside, it sometimes looks like politeness or forgetting but it’s neither of these things.

1. We forgive for our own benefit.   Forgiveness is not saying “it’s Ok” but, rather, “I’m OK”.  Ultimately, it is a choice not to let whatever happened hurt us anymore.  I have seen people who are almost defined by the event they refuse to forgive – often bitter, vengeful and hard, their non-forgiveness is apparent even when they don’t realise it.  Yet the people they won’t forgive have likely moved on and are unaware of the resentment harboured towards them.  Those who won’t forgive don’t see that their forgiveness is for themselves and that they suffer most for their decision not to allow it.

2. Forgiving is not pretending it never happened. When we forgive, we are forgiving the person, not their actions. We let go of our resentment towards them.  What happened may still upset us when we think of it but we no longer see ourselves as the victim of a personal attack.  With time, we may even recognise the gift hidden in the experience – something we needed to learn about ourselves.  I think this is what is meant by the phrase, “forgiven, not forgotten”.

“Anger makes you smaller, while forgiveness forces you to grow beyond what you were”. – Cherie Carter-Scott

3. We can’t force someone (or ourselves) to forgive. A list of reasons to forgive is not going to make someone forgive because forgiveness does not happen through logic – it happens through love. Taking a moment to see the humanness of the person whose actions hurt us can help open us up to forgiving them.  When we recognise that the other’s hurtful behaviour was caused by their issues & misconceptions, we realise that whatever happened wasn’t about us at all.  It then becomes easier to forgive because we know we can relate – we have issues & misconceptions of our own that affect our behaviour.  Seeing that we are all ultimately the same enables us to be compassionate instead of judgemental and willing to forgive.

4. Forgiveness doesn’t require an apology. Just as whatever happened to hurt us wasn’t really about us, forgiving isn’t really about the other person. Because it’s not about them, we can choose to let forgiveness in at any time without an exchange of words.  When we do receive an apology, it is an invitation to forgive, a reminder that the power to do so is in our hands.  We simply decide that we are open to forgiving and allow Love to do the rest.

 

HOW TO TEACH OUR CHILDREN ABOUT FORGIVENESS

Having defined “forgiveness”, the big question is how to teach our children about it.  We want them to really understand what it is so they don’t just go through the motions of forgiveness because it is expected of them, to appear polite.  There are a number of things we can do towards giving them a full picture of forgiveness –

Forgive our children.  Once our children have offered us an apology for something or been through the consequences of their inappropriate actions, it is over – I repeat, OVER!  Often I have seen a child put through the consequences & offer an apology and still have to endure 10 more minutes of lecturing or suffer the cold shoulder for the rest of the day.  What’s happening in these situations? – their parents haven’t forgiven them.

Let our children see us forgiving others around us.  There are many small acts of forgiveness in a day for our children to witness.  We forgive their siblings when they shout at us.  We forgive our partners for being home late.  We forgive the shop assistant who over-charged us and had to put us through the lengthy paperwork required to refund us.  When someone offers an apology to us, our children should see us accept it with a “thank you”.  (Accepting an apology is not forgiving them on the spot, just appreciating their acknowledgement that they have hurt us).  We can also talk to our children about the compassion we have for those who have wronged us.  Eg. “The shop assistant made a mistake when he was adding up our purchases, we all make mistakes sometimes”.  This shows our children that forgiveness comes from Love, and that judgement has no place alongside forgiveness.

Notice and talk about it when we see that our child has or hasn’t forgiven someone.  We can talk with our children about how they feel to have let go or to be holding on to their resentment.  This will make them more aware of how their choice to forgive or not impacts themselves.

Don’t expect our children to forgive straightaway.  Often they will need time to allow the emotions of the situation to pass before they’re able to forgive.  (This is true for adults too.)  If they’re not yet ready to forgive a playmate, suggest they play apart for a while.  If they are offered an apology, they can receive it with a “thank you” and forgive when they are ready.  (You may also be interested to read my post Should I Make My Children Apologise?)

Suggest your child pray for help to forgive if they’re finding it hard.  Logic changes the mind, Love changes the heart.  While we choose to allow forgiveness in, it is a matter for the heart.  Prayer opens us up to receive the love we may need for the task.    This suggestion is probably suitable for school-aged children but we can say a prayer to help our younger children along.

 

IN SUMMARY: THE GIFT OF FORGIVENESS

Forgiveness is, I think, one of the most important spiritual and life skills we need to learn.  Yet, it is something easily overlooked by parents.  It would be easy to teach our children to graciously accept an apology without addressing the inner process required to truly forgive.

Forgiveness is an act of self-love.  When we refuse to forgive, we are really refusing ourselves freedom – the freedom to live with openness and joy. Like any skill, we get better at forgiving by practising it. When children forgive the child who called them a hurtful name, the parent who punished them unfairly, the teacher who overlooked them for an opportunity, they’ll more readily forgive the more painful experiences that are a part of life.

It is not weak to forgive.  It makes us stronger.  We can travel further if we’re not lugging our resentments around with us.

Nothing is unforgivable.

 

Much love to you and your little souls,

2 replies
    • Julie
      Julie says:

      Hi Marie Thank you for your comment. I think we can all do with taking time to reflect on what forgiveness really is regardless of our age. I’m thrilled to be able to contribute a little something to you and the children you teach. Love Julie

      Reply

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