A young boy laughing as he reads a book

Joy – Good Nutrition, Not a Guilty Pleasure

I’m aware of a book called Joy is My Compass – Taking the Risk to Follow Your Bliss by Alan Cohen.  Despite declaring in January that joy will be my compass for 2017, I’ve not yet read the book but the phrase joy is my compass captivated me.  It reminds me that we are intended to live joyfully – not in the fearful, grasping way we are socialised to.  It can be hard to switch from believing that sacrifice & sheer hard work are required to live a good life to allowing ourselves joy and, even, prioritising our joy.  But my intention is to raise my boys with a different world view – to value joy, to seek it and create it in every moment.  I want joyful to be our normal.  For such a life, joy is the perfect compass.

 

HOW ARE JOY & HAPPINESS DIFFERENT?

Happiness comes to us in moments.  It is dependent on external circumstances – like getting a particular job, partner or fashion item.  Therefore, just as easily as favourable circumstances can come and go, so, too, can happiness.  Happiness is high GI, causing spikes in our emotions.  Joy is something quieter yet deeper and more stable.  There is a sense of meaning in joy that there isn’t in happiness.  It is always available to us, we just have to choose it.  And there are so many ways to let joy in.

“Happiness is like rising bubbles — delightful and inevitably fleeting. Joy is the oxygen — ever present” – Danielle La Porte

My son Jake, loves eating ice-cream and he also loves building Lego.  I would argue that the ice-cream makes him happy but, once it’s eaten, the happiness it brought dissipates quickly.  On the other hand, building Lego is a fun & engrossing activity for him and the satisfaction he gets from it is nourishing in a way that ice-cream just isn’t.  I would call this joy. Danielle says that “joy is the fibre of your soul”.  It is the fuel for our lives.  Joy is low GI.

 

THE VALUE OF JOY

Joy Indicates Spiritual Alignment

Joy is our natural way of being.  It indicates to us that we are in alignment.   By this, I mean that our mind, body and spirit are working together for the greater purposes of our soul.  I think the experience of flow is actually an experience of deep joy.   I wrote the following about flow in my post How Our Children Raise Us

At times, I have watched my boys play and have recognised their feeling of full absorption & joy from my own childhood.  I used to get it when I was swimming in our pool, singing along to music and writing stories. Scientists call this state “flow” and I think of it as allowing God to flow through me.  Do you remember the healing quality of that feeling?  How content and internally energised it left you?

Now, I still experience flow when I write and have found a way to use my writing to encourage other parents.  What brings our children joy in childhood may be the same things that bring them joy in adulthood.  Those things may end up being connected with the contribution they make in the world.

Joy Attracts More Joy

Have you noticed how a day that begins with joy often continues that way?  Perhaps it starts with a particularly heart-felt “good morning” hug from your child which you take a moment to appreciate fully, right down to your toes.   Then, as you go about your day, people everywhere seem to be particularly friendly & helpful to you and, in the afternoon, you receive a piece of good news then your partner arrives home in the evening with your favourite wine/chocolate/desert for “no reason”.   It just feels that life is going well for you and you feel joyful. This is the law of attraction at work.  We attract the feeling we are putting out.  So, by deliberately letting joy in where we find it (and it’s always there), we cultivate more joyful experiences.  Choosing what we focus on is key to utilising the power of this law – so let’s focus on joy!

Joy Supports Emotional Resilience

When joyful is our normal, our capacity to weather difficult experiences is much greater.  No matter how much joy we cultivate, life is intended to grow us and no one is exempt from its challenges.  With a joyful way of being, though, we know we have that joyful place to return to once we are through the difficult experience.  My son Jake is easily joyful, something I am so grateful for.  As a result, he moves through difficult emotions quite quickly.  It’s not that upsetting emotions should be avoided – they have something to tell us – but they don’t need to keep us down.  We can even feel that life is ultimately joyful while at the same time going through a major experience that deeply saddens or angers us.

 

CULTIVATING JOY IN OUR CHILDREN

  1. Notice the activities, places and people who bring our children joy and create opportunities for them to spend time with these people, places and activities. For example a place may be anywhere by water and a person may be a particular friend who is on the same wavelength.  I don’t think having things brings joy but the actual using of things may bring joy – such as playing an instrument or, as in Thomas’ case, the process of lining up his toy cars.
  2. Help our children to recognise for themselves the activities, places and people who bring them joy. For younger children, we might point out “you seem to feel really good when you’re playing outside with a ball”.  For older children, we might ask, “which of your friends do you feel most like yourself and relaxed with?”
  3. Teach our children joyful habits of mind. Gratitude is a powerful place to start.  Self-love is essential.
  4. When we notice our children are in a joyless state of mind, perhaps whining for things they want or hanging on to a grudge after a sibling argument, remind them that they will get more of how they feel and help them to choose a more joyful state of mind.
  5. When things are deteriorating for the whole family, stop for a joy break. Having fun with people we love is a joyful experience and can act as the reset button for everyone.  Our family loves playing indoor soccer together.
  6. Find a way to do the boring/difficult things joyfully. When my boys were younger, I used to sing a tidying song as we put away the toys.  I find interesting ways for my son to practise the spelling words he’s learning for school. This shows them that joy is always there, waiting for us to notice it and to take it.
  7. Be the example of joyful living. Our example is our greatest teacher.  Be joyful for your children’s sake…and your own.

 

IN SUMMARY – NUTRITION FOR OUR SOULS

Joy can feel like a guilty pleasure at first, especially for those of us who have been taught that using our own effort is the only way to build a satisfying life.  But, if joy is our compass, pointing in the direction of our purpose and giving our lives richness & ease, it is, surely, nutrition for our souls. Actually, there’s also a book called The Joy Diet by Martha Beck (and also on my “books to read” list). I’m putting my family on the diet now.

 

Much love to you and your little souls,

 

PS – Where is your compass pointing?  Comment below.

 

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